Trisha Early

Location: Red Oak

Patricia M. Earley (aka Trisha)

Landscapes of rural America from an East Coaster’s point of view

Born & raised in Springfield, PA (aka Philly Suburbs)

Lives & works in Red Oak, IA

Education

University of Nebraska Omaha, BFA Studio Arts  – Painting with English Minor

From Coloring Books to Paintings

     I am a colorist and a landscape artist. My fascination with illustration and the outrageousness of color began with three childhood influences. First, the murals of Maxfield Parrish and the illustrations of N.C. Wyeth, Howard Pyle, and Harvey Dunn – these illustrators instilled in me a love for colorful story telling. The second was a childhood pastime that inspired a love of graphic design. Coloring books. And the last was a lifetime of viewing the world through windows be they car, plane, train, kitchen, or school.

      I paint to inform, recount, and reinterpret my environment through forms and colors true to my emotional memory. These memories are snapshots that I reinterpret through my visceral reaction to a moment, time of day, or turn of a season. For me, color is universal in that it evokes memory, inspires emotions, and transcends language.

      The shape or construct of my work has influences of its own – windows. I am a daydreamer who has spent a lifetime staring out windows lost in some daydream or hours driving only viewing my environment from the vantage point of my windshield. I digest nature through windows and/or TV/computer screens. This confined perception of the natural world through these filters is what lies behind my work. I cherish the mundane. The scene often overlooked. The ordinary. A dichotomy that I explore through use of shapes, colors, and textures that are familiar yet oddly foreign.

      I approach my work through several stages of investigation; photography, manipulation and recolor via Photoshop, convert to black & white print, transfer to birch board, then use oil glazes and crayons to color. The choice of a more vertical or square orientation references windows, reinforces the natural unnaturalness, and conflicts with the historical genre of landscape painting. My choice to apply the paint/crayons in layers reflects the layers of emotion, the layers of memory. My choice to use ink transfer and crayons is to honor my lifetime addiction to coloring books.

      My current work is an exploration of small town life in rural Iowa capturing glimpses of its life, past and present. My paintings are the roadmaps of observation, investigation, and reconnection with the environment that informs my life.

The Five One 8